Asta 2

BSG: The Hub

This week I shall be in the minority. Well, me and indigo419 who is my brain twin this week. ;) I have seen many people discuss how much they liked, even loved, ‘The Hub’. I am not one of those people. I didn’t hate it. I wasn’t tempted to reach for the remote and change the station and, yes, I have been tempted to do that on a couple of occasions.


I rewatched the episode this morning with fresh eyes. Last night I felt I was channeling Temperance Brennan. For those of you who don’t know who I am referring to, she’s the forensic anthropologist extraordinaire on Bones and her signature line is some sort of variation on “What does that mean?” I found myself asking that question a lot. I'm just not sure what the point was. There was nothing really new here and shouldn't they be making every episode count?

I still feel that Jane Espenson lacks a grasp of these characters. I was happy Lee was only present in Laura’s visions. And as much as I appreciated the comedic pairing of Laura and Baltar, it didn’t feel right. Baltar regressed to his Season 1 persona and I wasn’t sure why, especially as he was trying to manipulate the centurion. How would getting a centurion to side with him or turn on the others be an asset? Did he just want to cause trouble? Did he want to make a power play and take over the ship? And to what end? I was amused by watching the centurion seemingly grow as annoyed with Baltar as humans and skinjobs alike, yet it felt like I was watching comedy for comedy’s sake. On BSG that is a very bad fit. Combining horror with comedy worked on Buffy, but Jane was working with a very different set of characters (teenage characters) and the supernatural rather than the actual near annihilation of humanity.

In addition to Baltar’s personality regression, his drug-induced confession didn’t sit quite right with me either. Much like Lee’s presidency, I knew, someday, Baltar would fess up about his part, however unintentional, in the destruction of the colonies. I just always thought the moment would be bigger. Maybe I also wanted to see some desire on his part to come clean. Instead, it’s a result from being weak from blood loss (which, by the way, is not going to be stopped by taping a piece of gauze over a gaping wound) and pain killers and he’s simply not thinking clearly. He’s also apparently completely bought into the religion he’s preaching to others. He has a clean slate. He no longer feels any guilt for what he did. That, again, is disappointing to me. And his reasoning is iffy at best on that point. God didn’t absolve him of his guilt, he did that himself.

Pythia described a flood that wiped out most of humanity? OK, then. We’ve had ‘All Along the Watchtower’, Zarek quoting Lincoln, Baltar quoting Shakespeare, Romo knowing Latin, and now a reference to Noah and the flood. If this has all happened before and will happen again, these references could be an indication it started with us. Did life begin out there or here on earth? Humanity might not be finding a new home, they might be coming home.

While Helo and Athena 2.0 was an interesting dynamic, I have to wonder why the show chose to create another Athena. Two scenarios occur to me and I care for neither. The first is they needed to set up a moral dilemma for Helo. With Athena 2.0 present it creates a connection to the Sharon models and makes him question his mission. As Laura rightly and succinctly points out, he’s not married to the entire production line. Added to that, his theory that all the Eights are different falls apart in the face of Boomer’s choices.

The other scenario is that we now have a backup Athena. If Athena on Galactica dies, then, no problem!, here is another Athena to take her place. But how close are the two? Do shared memories make them the same person? It was clear to me that through Athena’s memories, Athena 2.0 had feelings for Helo. And they were very close during the mission. However, when Helo revealed he had to follow orders (which made me smirk given his past picking and choosing of which orders to follow), Sharon was hurt and angry that he betrayed her trust and made a fool of her. If she really was Athena then she would have understood why Helo made the choice he made. Hell, Athena would have done the same thing.

To add to the earth references, The Beatles apparently had it right, all you need is love. I don’t have a problem with that idea. Love has been an important thread in the fabric of the series since the beginning. We’ve experienced the need for the love of friends and family, the love of God, the love of idealism – the list could go on. Human beings need love and the Cylons have a desire to know what it’s like to be loved, exemplified by the Six line. So saying that Laura, who has increasingly closed herself off to the world and people, needs love, yes, I can accept this. I just had issues with how this revelation was depicted.

As thrilled as I was to see Elosha back, who and what was she really? I suppose we could view her as another Head character, yet the show has made it clear Laura Roslin is not the final Cylon. I have enough faith in the show to believe that D’Anna is not going to play another round of Gotcha! with Laura. Is Elosha a side effect of the Chamalla, which I have assumed that Laura has been using in combination with the Diloxin? If she is, why haven’t we seen her before now? She appeared whenever the basestar jumped so I suppose we are to believe she is a by-product of those moments when the basestar exists outside the norms of time and space. But why is Laura the only one having visions and speaking to the dead? Kara suffered migraines during jumps upon her return to the fleet, but she didn’t see dead people. Having Elosha back was cool and a potentially good idea, but there is no explanation as to why she is there and that frustrates me.

The other problem I had with the reappearance of Elosha and forcing Laura to watch herself on her death bed. It was heavy handed and some of what we saw in those scenes had been conveyed to us in previous episodes in a far subtler manner. Lee had already talked to Laura about the need to reconnect with the people and humanity and I felt she was starting to see his point of view. She’s stated that she knows time is slipping away from her. Did she actually have to witness her death and Adama placing his wedding ring on her dead body to realize she didn’t have many chances left? I was also put off by Head Elosha’s declaration that Laura didn’t make room for people anymore and didn’t love anyone. I don’t believe that to be true. I feel Laura’s compartmentalized her feelings, packed her personal needs and desires away, because she had decided she needed to put humanity first – the needs of the many outweighing the needs of the few or the one. She was being selfless. And her motives were, unfortunately, lost to those outside a very few (Adama, Lee, Billy, Tory). It hurt her presidency by not showing the general population how much she does care. But those closest to her knew full well she was capable of love. Yes, I know, this was probably just her subconscious expressing her worst fears to her, but the way this story was structured it’s hard for me to determine intent.

The, what I shall call, Han Solo Moment at the end also didn’t sit right with me.

Laura: "I love you."
Adama: "About time."


That should have been reversed. Adama finally admitted to others that he couldn’t live without Laura and took action rather than wallowing in teenage angst. Laura, in my humble opinion, has been wise to Adama’s feeling for some time. I would have loved for him to get off that raptor, reveal his feelings, and her to say in return, "About time." It also would have worked better, for me, since I don’t believe she has the depth of feelings for him that he has for her.

I did appreciate two aspects of Laura’s storyline. Nearly letting Baltar die was very in character. At last, she had her suspicions confirmed and had an opportunity to do what she had attempted to do with the trial – act as judge, jury, and executioner. And given that much of the focus of the episode was Laura’s sacrifices to be the leader of humanity she felt she needed to be, a position she was put in by Baltar’s actions, there had to be an element of personal payback. But I was relieved her conscience told her that she was better than what she was about to do.

The other thing I really liked was the parallel drawn between Laura and Lee and their potentially dueling presidencies. It seems that they may be closer than they realize and that Laura hasn’t completely lost her idealism. Head Elosha talked to Laura about humanity proving itself worthy of surviving and Laura helping humanity earn its "right to survive". In ‘Sine Qua Non’, Lee stated, "Faith in ourselves, in our right to survive as a species, as a people, that’s not a given, that’s a choice." Laura, perhaps, had taken for granted that humanity had an inherent right to continue. But, here, she made choices that reaffirmed not only her right to survive, but held out hope for humanity. She helped Baltar to live, acknowledging that, even given his past, his life, all lives, have the potential for worth. And she allowed herself the opportunity to love, realizing in sacrificing so much of herself, she was sacrificing what she was fighting for.

Thoughts on various other moments:

I liked the shot of Adama, Lee, and Kara at Laura’s bedside. In her imagination, it’s important to her that those three people should be at her side in her final hours. And I loved that Lee was visibly upset by her impending death and Kara had to comfort him. Given the various emotions and gestures taking place, it was a Shippers Unite! moment. 

Recall how I bitched about Emily’s final hours in ‘Faith’ and how the show got it wrong, wrong, wrong? Well, they got Laura’s death right.

I’ve never had strong feelings one way or another about D’Anna, but I really enjoyed her return. Snapping Cavil’s neck, telling Boomer she’ll switch allegiances as soon as something shiny catches her eye, and totally faking out Laura.

Of course, D’Anna seemed to have lost a few brain cells during the latest resurrection informing Laura that Baltar had been injured. REALLY? What was the tip off? His white complexion or the pool of blood she was standing in? :p

Couldn’t the Cylons build another Hub? Sure, it would probably take years, but I don’t see why they couldn’t start over. Recall how the rebels celebrated blowing up the Death Star? They already had another one under construction!

Was this the first time Helo said, "Athena, my wife"? Is there going to be a shift in how he refers to her with the reveal of another Sharon having her memories? And did anyone else think of Farscape and Aeryn’s dilemma with the two Johns?
  • Current Mood: blank blank
I've watched other shows that Jane has been involved with and had no problem with her writing. Maybe this show is just too dark for her to work with.
I keep going back to the feeling that some big things happened, yet the moments didn't feel big. Maybe the comedic interludes prevented a proper building of tension. I would have thought Baltar would have been more in panic mode rather than having a casual chat with a centurion.

Another thing just occurred to me. Laura walking around in circles and returning to the same point of time seemed familiar to me and I couldn't figure out why, until now. In 'Weight of the World' Willow keeps following Buffy back to the Magic Box and then she and Buffy have the epiphany of what's causing Buffy to be catatonic. Jane didn't write that episode, but she's well aware of it.
Obviously the Empire had more of a plan than the Cylons. But we sort of knew that.

On rewatch Baltar's movements really made me go WTF? I was so taken with Mary and Roslin on the first watch that I ignored the meaning of what he was doing. But now I'm confused about what they were going for with him and the Centurion.
But Cylons are much hotter than Stormtroopers. ;)

I focused more on Mary/Laura on rewatch (be thankful I didn't do a write up on Friday night!) and I gained a better understanding of what they were trying to do with her, but I'm still at a loss as to what the hell was going on with Baltar. He's just been kidnapped by the Hybrid, essentially, and he's not at all concerned by this. Who is this person? Baltar is a drama queen! Laura, yeah, she stays calm in a crisis, but not Baltar. And why have a chat with a centurion? If they had established he had a plan to get the centurions on his side, take over the ship, and jump back to the fleet, I could maybe have bought that, but they didn't convey at all that that was what he was thinking.
I don't know about the Centurion, but my theory was that he was genuinely trying to convert the Centurion, to spread God's Love or some such. It was weird because it seemed to be played for laughs - and as though he was trying to find an escape route - and yet I think Baltar is taking his role as Prophet seriously. And so I was confused.
In her days on Buffy, I think Jane was use to having the best of both worlds. She could have bad guys (The Mayor, Glory) who could also be wacky and funny. Joss set that tone from day one of the series whereas Ron started with a holocaust and has chosen to maintain a dark tone about 99.999% of the time. But Ron had ample opportunity to step in and tell Jane to tone down the humor and didn't so, ultimately, the fault lies with him.
my brain twin this week. ;)

ha! *iz flattered* :0) You're much more eloquent about the hits & misses of this ep.

See, now I don't have a problem with Head!Elosha because she seemed to work consistently with how Head!Leoben worked for Kara. I personally think they're avatars for the Colonial Gods, just as Head!Six is the Cylon God's Angel, just as she claimed to be. Still unsure what to make of Head!Baltar beyond a much more attractive version of James Callis on screen during Baltar's bad hair days. He might be the avatar for the Cylon God himself, with Baltar as his human proxy. We shall see. Knowing what RDM did with DS9, I strongly suspect a huge religious smack down as part of the epic final battle.

Admittedly, I am still on the squee of my first viewing only. I'll definitely have to rewatch with some of your criticisms in mind. I am generally with you on your take on Jane and BSG in general, but this was the first episode she's done that I've truly liked.
I agree, Head Elosha and Head Leoben shared some similarities, both acting as guides, helping Laura and Kara navigate their subconscious and their conscience. And both visited as their 'hosts' faced death, Kara's being more immediate than Laura's. Which is where the murkiness starts. Why didn't Elosha visit Laura sooner? Or later? Why now? And did the jumps trigger her appearance as the Maelstrom triggered Leoben's? Is their some force in the universe controlling these visions? Does Laura assume that the Chamalla ir weakness from her Diloxin treatments are contributing to these visions? She seemed rather nonplussed about them. And if they are avatars as you believe, I'm not sure I'll be thrilled with the idea of so overtly stating that the gods are pulling the strings.
have seen many people discuss how much they liked, even loved, ‘The Hub’. I am not one of those people.
Me neither.

Baltar regressed to his Season 1 persona and I wasn’t sure why, especially as he was trying to manipulate the centurion. How would getting a centurion to side with him or turn on the others be an asset?
I completely agree--you're so right that it was comedy for comedy's sake. And in an otherwise completely unfunny season of BSG, that sits worse than ever.

Much like Lee’s presidency, I knew, someday, Baltar would fess up about his part, however unintentional, in the destruction of the colonies. I just always thought the moment would be bigger.
*nods again* It was an odd moment, oddly anticlimactic. I think if he'd actually died after saying that it would have given it more impact, but of course that couldn't happen for other narrative reasons.

He’s also apparently completely bought into the religion he’s preaching to others. He has a clean slate. He no longer feels any guilt for what he did. That, again, is disappointing to me
Thats hugely, massively problematic to me.

To add to the earth references, The Beatles apparently had it right, all you need is love. I
Hahaha, I *SO* nearly used that it a far more snarky way in my review, but I belatedly edited out most of the snark. ;)

Yes, I know, this was probably just her subconscious expressing her worst fears to her, but the way this story was structured it’s hard for me to determine intent.
That sums up my problems with it too.

That should have been reversed. Adama finally admitted to others that he couldn’t live without Laura and took action rather than wallowing in teenage angst.
I wholeheartedly agree.

Thank you so much for your articulate thoughts on the episode, I found it so hard to rally anything to say this week but I really appreciate reading your thoughts.
And in an otherwise completely unfunny season of BSG, that sits worse than ever.

The season has been, for the most part, very bleak so to suddenly have them, not just throw in a humorous line, but have entire comedic scenes felt very off. I'm a big fan of 'Tigh Me Up, Tigh Me Down', but the scenes of the dinner party from hell weren't intercut with Laura taking her last breaths.

I *SO* nearly used that it a far more snarky way in my review, but I belatedly edited out most of the snark.

Hee. I think we need an icon of "All you need is love" combined with an image of Laura rolling her eyes. ;)
I'm a big fan of 'Tigh Me Up, Tigh Me Down', but the scenes of the dinner party from hell weren't intercut with Laura taking her last breaths.
Yeah. I felt the same way. It wasn't quite as bad as the time Smallville intercut scenes of Lex having his child and wife die on him and being shot himself in an alleyway with scenes of Clark helping Santa (ACTUAL Santa) distribute gifts for Christmas... but it was getting there. ;)

I think we need an icon of "All you need is love" combined with an image of Laura rolling her eyes. ;)
Heeee! That would make me feel a lot better about the episode, I think. *G*

I have considered a crackvid along that concept...
*listens to it on ipod and giggles*
I want to time 'all together now!' to the slow clapping wankfest! :D :D :D

This could well be the therapy exercise I need about BSG...
I did an awful lot of thinking about Baltar's confession and his repugnant lack of any sense of responsibility over in my journal, but ultimately, I think I like the way it happened, as long as the writers are aware that they have, basically, made Baltar loathsome. Something about the utter nonsequitor of that confession in that tone in that environment, and Laura's uncomprehending and amazingly acted response as her world falls apart in front of her, with Gaius talking so casually. Yeah, it would have been nice to see a deliberate confession, but in many ways, I'm not sure I believe a mentally competant Baltar could ever confess.

Regarding all the Earth references, yeah, the Flood was interesting. I mean that's an image that repeats in human myths from the Judeochrisitan story of Noah to the oldest Indian religious verses that probably date back to the Indus Valley civilisation - the oldest civilisation we know of on earth. I think the thinking is that it's actually some sort of recorded version of the melting ice caps and the rising sea levels after the ice age. But that's a tale that's geographically tied to earth, rather than something we can blag as a natural evolutionary thing like being afraid of the dark.

To be honest with you, at this point I'm leaning toward parallel universe anyway, although I've always thought that the colonies came from Earth originally, and that the circular time thing that's going on shows them exodusing to-and-from it. The only question is, are they going to arrive in our future? Did they leave during the Graecian times? Are they going to arrive during the Graecian times?

At the same time, it's also easy to write off the Latin as "whatever ancient language they're actually speaking translated to Latin the way they translate their native language to English to give us a "feel" for what's being said." And the Flood as a general epic reference that might even be supposed to be about Atlantis which the Graecians certainly had myths about, so the Flood doesn't necessarily have to stretch anything further than it's already stretched by making them Graecoroman polytheists.

I don't have so much else to add, except to say I agree with a lot of what you say even though I...really, really liked this episode because I'm just in love with Mary McDonnell's acting during Baltar's confession. But I do have to say one other thing -

I completely and TOTALLY agree with you about the Han Solo moment. It really needed to be reversed. I like it better if Roslin's admission (while yes, aimed at Bill specifically) is a general change in attitude - a sense that she will embrace and love people now. So it's less that I have a problem with Laura saying what she said, because Laura looks at herself and makes decisions and sticks with them. It's that Adama got that cocky line when he's the one - IMO - who has been holding back, and when it basically robs his character of the chance to act on his revelation from last episode. What has he learned now? That his method of wandering through life - acting like the Daddy and expecting reality to fall in line - works?! GRR!

ETA: Re: the Hub and building another one - that bothered me too. The only way I can explain it is the same reason they continue to use the Hybrids to navigate even though they don't actually understand them. And the way they've alluded to not knowing who their own creators were in a way that made it sound like neither inferior centurions nor humanity's original designs. And the reason they're prohibited from thinking of the Final Five. I think that the Final Five may have made them (and then wiped their own memories and disappeared into the human population?) and they don't quite understand entirely how they work? Or, they have a theoretical understanding but lack the capabilities to build an entirely new model (like number 13) from scratch or correctly re-assemble a new Hub? Like if we had alien technology that we understood partially and could fix/patch up but couldn't replicate completely? I dunno...I'm making up my own explanations to keep myself sane... ;)

Edited at 2008-06-09 01:03 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure I believe a mentally competant Baltar could ever confess.

Me either. I just had a desire to see him want to confess. We see him take baby steps, OK, the baby is shuffling it's feet, towards becoming a better person. Praying to god to save the boy? I felt that was genuine. So, yeah, I was hoping that someday Baltar would make that choice to come clean and try to redeem himself. Whether or not he'd actually succeed is another matter.

although I've always thought that the colonies came from Earth originally, and that the circular time thing that's going on shows them exodusing to-and-from it.

It would be interesting to discover that earth is both the planet people wish to escape from and escape to. It would also serve to show that we keep repeating the same mistakes. I couldn't really see Galactica arriving in earth's past then. Maybe they arrive in out future, find a the planet devastated by a nuclear war, but stick around to try to rebuild civilization.

I like it better if Roslin's admission (while yes, aimed at Bill specifically) is a general change in attitude - a sense that she will embrace and love people now.

Yes! Because I do think she had the epiphany that for the sake of herself and the fleet she needed to open herself up again, to love, to caring about the people instead of just obsessing over leading them to earth. And Lee planted the idea in her head. So, to say that Adama and his feelings for her and vice versa made her see the light, Lee had already flipped the switch.

It's that Adama got that cocky line when he's the one - IMO - who has been holding back, and when it basically robs his character of the chance to act on his revelation from last episode. What has he learned now? That his method of wandering through life - acting like the Daddy and expecting reality to fall in line - works?!

It could be argued that given the parallel timelines that Laura and Adama had their revelations at the same time. Still, as you point out and I completely agree with, it's Adama who has been holding back emotionally for, oh, years. So, finally, he has this big epiphany and abandons the fleet and his life to go to her and, supposedly, tell her how he feels, yet she's the one that says, "I love you" while, once again, he gets to play it safe as someone close to him bares their soul. Sigh.
No, I completely agree with you. I feel like this *could* have been an awesome ep and just wasn't. *Shrug*
It's one of those episodes where the ideas were there, but the execution wasn't.
We've already talked about some of this over at my journal, but I did want to say that I agree with you about the "Han Solo moment," much as I did enjoy that scene generally. My more generous way of explaining it is that he's speaking for them both, that it's about time that they both got their acts together. I admit this reading requires a lot of squinting and turning the head sideways. Less generously, Bill is perfectly himself here, assuming that once he's decided something, it is and always has been: he finally figured out he loved her, so therefore the fact that it took him so damned long to do so becomes wiped away. Such a pain in the ass, our Bill!

A reversal of the scene might have worked, but I'm not sure I would have liked that, either. Laura has, of course, been wise to Bill's feelings for her for far longer than he has, but I'm not sure she was really prepared to have him acknowledge them before this. And her vision self does look truly surprised at the depth of his feelings as she's watching him at her deathbed. I think I'd have most preferred a mirror of their greeting: he says "missed you," and she says "me, too." Then she says "I love you," and he (after sufficient emotional pause) says "me, too." Then they're on even footing, their dual revelations of the past two episodes fitting each other without some idea that one of them "wins" for having figured it out first. (It's hard to tell what the exact timing was, but they may have figured it out fairly simultaneously, or perhaps Laura was even first, because the baseship was already jumping back to Bill's mysterious rendezvous point after blowing the hub while Bill was having his crisis and epiphany.)
My more generous way of explaining it is that he's speaking for them both, that it's about time that they both got their acts together. I admit this reading requires a lot of squinting and turning the head sideways.

I also wonder if the delivery of the line is a problem. Going back to Han, had Harrison Ford chosen to say "I know" in a manner other than he did I may have thought he was being an ass. Bill just came off as over-confidant to me.

Less generously, Bill is perfectly himself here, assuming that once he's decided something, it is and always has been: he finally figured out he loved her, so therefore the fact that it took him so damned long to do so becomes wiped away.

And that actually makes it all a little clearer. ;)
The confession didn't sit that well, but Mary McDonnell acted the hell out of that scene. I love the way she just started shaking and then froze up and looked like the angel of death.
Did life begin out there or here on earth? Humanity might not be finding a new home, they might be coming home.

That's seemed to me like the only possible explanation all the way back to when they were in the Tomb of Athena. At that point, Roslin recognized the constellations as the ancient flags of the twelve tribes, which means that those constellations were known and used pre-Kobol. Then, of course, there's the fact that for those constellations to appear in the Tomb without humanity originating on Earth, the Thirteenth Tribe would have had to flee Kobol, go to Earth, see the constellations, go back to Kobol to build the Tomb, and then presumably set up a trail of breadcrumbs so convoluted that the Twelve Tribes would need Indiana Jones to help them find their way to Earth millennia later. Oh, and there's also the fact that, to my understanding, the Sacred Scrolls pre-date Kobol and being with the line, "Life here began out there." So it's clear that humanity didn't begin on Kobol, at any rate.


How would getting a centurion to side with him or turn on the others be an asset? Did he just want to cause trouble? Did he want to make a power play and take over the ship? And to what end?

This was the only character moment that really kind of rang true for me. I didn't take it as Baltar having a plan or working an any type of agenda. I think it was just a demonstration that that is what Gaius is -- he's the snake in the garden, the sower of discord and chaos. It's in his nature. Someone left him alone near a centurion, and he instinctively started in on the most subversive topic of conversation possible. He said it himself -- he's the flood. The flood does what it does.


Couldn’t the Cylons build another Hub?

Don't get me started. Even if there is some reason that it couldn't be done (someone else made some interesting comments on that above that seemed at least somewhat plausible), it really frosted my cookies that none of the humans even seems to have asked the obvious question. And besides, aren't there still resurrection ships, regardless of what the hub's final fate was?


After reading your slicing and dicing of the character moments (and having pretty much been disgusted with many of the plot elements, myself), I'm starting to rethink giving this episode a 5 out of 10. I'm saddened...
Then, of course, there's the fact that for those constellations to appear in the Tomb without humanity originating on Earth, the Thirteenth Tribe would have had to flee Kobol, go to Earth, see the constellations, go back to Kobol to build the Tomb, and then presumably set up a trail of breadcrumbs so convoluted that the Twelve Tribes would need Indiana Jones to help them find their way to Earth millennia later.

Yet, it still makes more sense than the latest Indiana Jones movie! ;) But, yes, I recall while watching 'Home, Part 2' that the story we were getting didn't make a lot of sense if people fled the colonies and colonized earth. Unless the whole 'it's happened before and it will happen again' means that every few thousand years humanity destroys where they are currently living and has to cross the galaxy back to their old home.

And besides, aren't there still resurrection ships, regardless of what the hub's final fate was?

I was wondering about that. Haven't the established that the Cylons are spread out across the galaxy? And given that Cavil knew the hub was a target, wouldn't he have made sure their resources were somewhat dispersed. I'm thinking there are more basestars out there and that, amongst them, some resurrection ships.