Asta 2

'Razor'

I finally got around to writing up some deeper thoughts on Razor. Not quite as long or meta-y as I anticipated, but I have more viewings planned. ;)


I’ve only watched Razor once thus far so I’m sure I’ll have more comments after additional viewings. Razor isn’t perfect and it’s not one of my favorite episodes, but I do think it is one of the best crafted installments of the series. The overriding feeling I had as I watched was that a lot of thought had been put into writing the episode/film. Ron and Co. were able to cover territory that, for whatever reason, they felt they couldn’t in Season 2 while also laying groundwork for Season 4 and managed to pull together the various elements successfully. With the exception of some too-heavy-on-the-foreshadowing dialogue between Lee and Kara in their final scene, I didn’t feel as if any aspect of the story was forced or came out of nowhere.

During the second season, the series got a little lax in terms of continuity, but not so (much) with Razor. We had a survivor count of 49,579 which would seem about right before the destruction of Cloud Nine. We saw numerous familiar faces even in the small roles. Actually, I think this was the most I ever heard Mr. Hoshi speak. The wireless broadcasts were an efficient and subtle way of establishing the timeframe. Laura outlawed abortion in ‘The Captain’s Hand’, so the ‘current’ events in Razor must take place days later. I even appreciated that they made Cain look younger and less sever looking.

I mentioned the heavy handed exchange between Lee and Kara, but there were some far subtler references I really appreciated. Kendra informing us that Gina’s last name is Geminese for “resurrection”. Kendra telling Gina she’s “a life saver”. And I think it was Adama that said, in reference to Kara and Kendra’s tense relationship, “I’d like to sell tickets to that dance.”

While early scenes did attempt to humanize Cain, any feelings of understanding by me were quickly dashed and she reverted to being the Queen Bitch of the Universe. Seeing her actions and orders played out on screen - no longer merely rumors or stories over dramatized after too much alcohol is consumed – did, however, make me more sympathetic towards her crew and even the Cylons.

Lee makes a comment to his father early on that one of his intentions is to “give the crew their pride back.” Cain didn’t just take away their pride, she took away their humanity. Until now, I thought Fisk was a selfish bastard, profiting from people’s misery and turning a blind eye to some horrendous criminal activity because he was simply a bad guy. I never considered that, at one point, Fisk was an honorable officer. One of the most memorable scenes for me was seeing Fisk’s reaction to the discovery of the civilian fleet and that they were no longer alone. The expression on his face conveyed joy and, in that moment, he was given hope again. Not only had Pegasus survived, but other human beings who were not as well equipped or well armed had. And if they survived, who knows who else may be out there?

It’s only seconds later that Cain makes her intentions clear. There is no discussion or contemplating options. It makes me wonder if she had already played out this possibility in her head, just in case the situation arose. Or in the moments following the attacks did life stop having meaning to her? Contrary to the lies she told her officers and supposed friends at her little dinner party, revenge, even to the point of the extinction of the human race, seemed to be her only goal.

When Cain gave the order to raid the ships, to take the supplies and people they needed, and abandon the people to die at the hands of the Cylons, Cain destroyed Fisk’s hope for the future. And when he was forced to participate in the massacre, she destroyed him. By the time the Galactica and fleet came along, it was too late, Fisk had given up and when the black market came calling he just gave in. He had seen and been a part of too much.

I wanted to come away from Razor believing that circumstance made Helena Cain what she was. I wanted to find out that, if the story was true, that shooting her XO (and, as it turned out, her close friend) in the head was warranted in some way. I wanted to see that the brutalization of Gina was not all her doing. But what I saw was a woman without a shred of hesitation or remorse. Something in her died long before this war.

There were two moments that made me believe that while the attacks revealed the worst in Cain and, by extension, what humanity is capable of, that she was already hard wired this way. First, there was her comment that we, the human race, “don’t have the luxury of becoming simply human again.” Since when was being human “simple” or a “luxury”? I really need to go back and watch Lee’s speech in ‘Crossroads’ because Cain, in her speech, is a representation of his worst fears. The other moment that struck me was seeing Gina after Thorne had dealt with her. The pain, fear, and degradation Cain had ordered showed clearly in not just Gina’s physical appearance, but her body language. She had the reaction any woman would have after being beaten, tortured, and raped. She was reacting as a human would. Cain, on the other hand, was emotionless; one could say acting like a machine. Cain destroyed the spark of humanity in Gina and while Gina hesitated in pulling the trigger in Razor because she genuinely felt something for Cain, when the opportunity arose again, she didn’t hesitate.

As for Lee, I think there was some interesting, if not character development, character enlightenment. I liked seeing Lee not entirely confidant in his new position as Commander. It made sense given he’s closer then ever to living in his father’s shadow, the history of his predecessors, and that he was on his way out of the military prior to the attacks and now facing a hell of a lot of unexpected responsibility. And he’s going to make mistakes. I’ve already seen certain segments of fandom up in arms over his order to, first, destroy the Cylon ship with the rescue team still on board and, then, ask Kara to stay behind to set off the nuke. Clearly, neither decision was an easy one for him. He didn’t make bad calls. Maybe, in the case of his first order, he did rush to judgment. But the one mission that overrides every other mission is saving the remnants of humanity and getting them to earth. He was seeing that in jeopardy. Later, in a rare moment of magnanimousness, Adama tells Lee that neither man made the wrong call onboard Pegasus, but were making decisions they believed they needed to make in order to accomplish their missions. (I only wish Adama would have remembered that during the New Caprica arc when Lee, justifiably, argued they should take the fleet and go.)

In my previous post on Razor I mentioned Adama causing me to holler at my computer screen. My exact words were, “You bastard!” Lee shouldn’t shoulder all the guilt over this botched mission. This whole mess started when Adama let a science team take a viper to research a super nova. I’m trying to figure out how in the midst of fleeing the Cylons and looking for earth Adama felt it was OK to let a team go off on their own to do a little research. Maybe if they had mentioned the super nova was a road sign on the way to earth, I could have bought it, but it was a key plot point coming out of nowhere. But the thing that really pissed me off is that Adama told Lee it was his rescue mission to run and as soon as Lee made a decision that Adama disagreed with, he rescinded Lee’s order and issued his own. He might as well have asked for a knife and taken Lee’s balls right there. Once again we get to see Lee proven wrong and Adama be the hero. If only it ended there. After they restore communications and they come to realize someone has to stay behind to detonate the nuke manually, suddenly, we get “This is your team son, you make the call.” WHAT?! I can see we’ll be going into Season 4 with Adama still being on my s*** list.

One other thing of note in regards to Lee and Kara, after having put Kara in a position to be killed, I have to wonder if it was, in part, a reason for wanting to stick so close to her in ‘Maelstrom’? It was obvious in that episode that he was trying to protect her as best he could and given his inability to shake off feelings of guilt, responsibility and failure I have to believe he was trying to atone in some way for his actions in here.

As for the prophecy about Kara, little miss “harbinger of death”…Eh. I’m not quite buying it. If not for communications being blocked, supposedly by the Cylons, I’d say it was a clear set-up. Since I have to rule that out, I just believe there is much more to the prophecy. After all, if she was going to lead the human race to their doom, why would the hybrid warn the human race of that? While some Cylons have had a change of heart about humanity, this is The First Hybrid and he hasn’t, to our knowledge, been influenced by outside forces.

Now for some random points:

• I found the intro very odd. If I didn’t know what I was watching I might have thought I had just tuned into a Lifetime film on cutting.

• Kendra seeing Pegasus for the first time reminded me of many an opening shot of the Enterprise in the various Star Trek series and films. Ron’s resume is showing. ;) I also thought the scene where Kendra shoots her own man out of mercy was a take on Picard shooting one of his crewmen before he could become a Borg in First Contact.

• Steve Bacic is apparently as good as his material because he wasn’t bad here.

• The effects were awesome and the scene in which we go inside the old Cylon fighter and hear the pilot say, “By you command”, actually gave me a chill.

• The flashback with Adama was well integrated. I liked how they depicted him as terrified after experiencing shared memories with the hybrid. It seemed a very Lee-like reaction. And with this new bit of history revealed we now can see why, in the mini, he knew Cylons have the ability to look like us.

• Lee and Laura were in a room together! They spoke! Hey, I have to take what I can get. ;)
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PART 1!
Awesome!

(Ha! You made me think so much I have to use two comments!)

I've been meaning to write up all my thoughts on this but haven't had the time - things have been really busy in RL lately and now I'm three hours away from leaving to get married so it'll have to wait until I'm back.

That said, I TOTALLY agree with you about Assdama. When he said he'd go along because he had a personal stake but it was still Lee's mission, I thought, okay, his call and this has the potential to be interesting. When he rescinded Lee's orders the first time he disagreed with him, I thought, okay, mildly hypocritical but he is the Admiral and so he's allowed to do that sort of thing, and the fact I don't like it is just a sign the military isn't for me.

When, after that - after he's taken the impossible call Lee psyched himself up to make away from Lee - he hands the situation (a situation he caused to happen) back to his son and demands that this time he actually make the call I thought...ass.

It was basically:

Lee: I have to put the survival of the fleet first and make a really difficult choice to kill my people and my best friend in the process.

Adama: No. I have decided we will put my adoption of your best friend first.

Lee. Okay, you're the Admiral.

*situation plays out*

Adama: Lee, I feel I have to remind you of the difficult responsibilities of command. Choose which of your people to leave to die for the greater good. I will stand here and look selfless and stoic.

Me: ASSDAMA! CAPSLOCK OF RAGE!

I really feel that the whole scenario broke the fourth wall for me; it felt very engineered to both allow Adama to look gritty and like he won't leave a man behind while simultaneously trying to paint him as gritty and willing to make sacrifices. But you can't have it all. And the way it played out for me was Adama passing the buck when it got tough and after he'd half-taken command of the situation, and Lee bravely, never hestitating.
Re: PART 1!
First off, you are three hours away for leaving to get married (Congratulations again!) and you are replying to my post. I am flattered. =)

When, after that - after he's taken the impossible call Lee psyched himself up to make away from Lee - he hands the situation (a situation he caused to happen) back to his son and demands that this time he actually make the call I thought...ass.

EXACTLY! I mean, he just allowed his son to go through hell in making such a tough call, then, you know, castrates him in front of his crew, and, finally, gives him back the responsibility to decide whether or not to kill his BFF and, OK, woman he loves. (Not that Adama EVER noticed that little point.)

Lee: I have to put the survival of the fleet first and make a really difficult choice to kill my people and my best friend in the process.

Adama: No. I have decided we will put my adoption of your best friend first.

Lee. Okay, you're the Admiral.

*situation plays out*

Adama: Lee, I feel I have to remind you of the difficult responsibilities of command. Choose which of your people to leave to die for the greater good. I will stand here and look selfless and stoic.


HEEEEEE!!! I love this!

We've had the discussion about Ron seeming to have a need to make Adama look heroic at any cost, even if it means further character assassination of Lee. I honestly don't think it's intentional. But it's hard to believe that Ron is oblivious to how ineffectual and weak Lee can come off in these situations. Then again, given that in 'A Day in the Life' Ron never dealt with the fact that Adama's deep denial left his sons in a horribly abusive home tells us that he doesn't always see what we see.
Actually the whole thing with Kara being left behind felt forced to me. Most of the episode I loved. I thought it was so much of a return to form. I didn't feel, as I was worried I'd feel, that it made no sense to tell this story now; it did. Both from an in- and out-of-universe perspective.

But the bit with Kara? Forced. I'm not cross about it because Lee would never sacrifice Kara. He totally would; it just didn't make sense in this instance.

Kendra (who I loved, btw!) was severely injured and the least likely to survive even if she returned to Pegasus. Why not leave her? From a practical perspective it makes the most sense; blood-chilling sense, maybe, but still sense. If it's got to do with rank - that the XO is simply more important a role or that her skills are unique, or even just purely based on rank - then again, it oughtn't be Kara. Who I'm sure outranks marine grunts and I'm also sure has more useful skills as a pilot than ground troops in what's essentially a shooting war in space. Plus she's one of the few surviving flight instructors.

So I'm left to believe that maybe Lee thought he was the only one he could trust to do it? That's a worrying thought because it undermines the military authority that keeps the fleet safe (though I don't judge them for it). Though it also indicates that they're not Cainites yet. Are we supposed to read into this a manipulation of Kara on Lee's part? That despite her insubordination she's the most likely to carry out a suicide mission because he knows, even now, how deeply unstable/self-hating/nihilistic she is? That would be an interesting situation (and I wouldn't even judge Lee for making use of his instinctive understanding of her in that situation) but I can't help but feel I'm trying to tie a transparently contrived storyline back to the wider points about how far along the Razor-road we can afford to go before we can't get back, and how close to the beginning of the road we can stay without dying. And that bugs me.

Couldn't they at least have made something up about manually triggering the nuke that meant only Kara or Kendra could pull it off? Something else equally contrived and stupid that would at least feel a little less bluntly manipulative? Feh.

Moving on to Cain, I really disagree with you. Not that she didn't come off as bitch queen of the universe, but just in my reading of her and how interesting and nuanced I found her and her reasons. And this is from someone who hated the civilian shooting revelation as cheap. Which I still sort of do. Though I love the fact that we're seeing the story of the murderer. I think a lot of it has to do with Michelle Forbes incredible acting.

I also can't really explain my reaction to Cain or what I think this story said about her until I rewatch, I think. Because I accept your points about the apparent lack of complexity (it's something I've seen commented on elsewhere too) but that's not how it feels in my gut. Maybe I'll be able to pin it down in my reaction post? I'll try.

Finally - I loved the "harbinger of ZOMG EVIL" moment, but I'm completely at a loss as to what it means. To the point I don't even want to try and reconcile it with the situation currently (though I may try later). If it has a cool resolution, it'll be amazing. If not then...eh. But that scene was dead important because it makes the story desperately important but so unimportant in the scheme of things in the fleet we could have missed it. Because there's a beautiful poetic irony to the person who received the message. Because it explains why we were told this story now and why we were told Kendra's story at all, and all this is done without it impinging on the power of the story as a standalone tale. It's just a great way to wrap the thing up and bring us back to the present and the situation.

But I may be gushing, so perhaps I should stop!

Icon used because if there was one thing Razor lacked, it was MOAR LAURA!
Kendra (who I loved, btw!) was severely injured and the least likely to survive even if she returned to Pegasus. Why not leave her? From a practical perspective it makes the most sense

I agree with you and I made that point in someone else's post. And someone responded to me saying that given the extent of Kendra's injuries, Lee couldn't risk her passing out or dying before she could detonate the bomb. I do think they could have established pretty quickly if she was able to fulfill the mission, but I also think it's a valid point to make.

So I'm left to believe that maybe Lee thought he was the only one he could trust to do it?

bop_radar argued that point at length in her post. :) Unfortunately, giving the current viewing circumstances, it's a Flocked post. The gist of her point was that in asking someone to give up their life to save others you have to know that they will follow through and Lee knew that of Kara. I felt that, yes, Lee knew, beyond a doubt, that Kara is the type of person to sacrifice herself for the greater good, but not that he believed she was up to the job because she is "deeply unstable/self-hating/nihilistic".

I've seen people really split in their interpretation of Cain so your feelings don't surprise me. ;) I do very much agree with you that it was interesting to see the story from the murderer's perspective. I have seen criticism that Razor was showing us what we were already told back in Season 2, that many scenes felt redundant, but I've always been left with the nagging feeling that Fisk over-dramatized Cain's actions. That there was more to it then we were told, but now we see that's not the case. Is that good or bad? I'm not sure at this point, but at least I have answers.

Without getting into spoilers, I have heard that there is at least one scene involving Cain that was cut for time that will likely be in the DVD release and it could alter my opinion of her. Maybe. ;)

But that scene was dead important because it makes the story desperately important but so unimportant in the scheme of things in the fleet we could have missed it. Because there's a beautiful poetic irony to the person who received the message. Because it explains why we were told this story now and why we were told Kendra's story at all, and all this is done without it impinging on the power of the story as a standalone tale. It's just a great way to wrap the thing up and bring us back to the present and the situation.

Again, I agree with you. I was really worried when I heard Razor was being used to lay groundwork for Season 4 and was taking place in Season 2. And we were being introduced to a new character we would likely not see again. But at the end we saw why Kendra was so important (there are people theorizing she could be the final Cylon) and, given past prophecies and events in 'Maelstorm', the Hybrid's words weren't something that came out of nowhere. I just don't personally think Kara will be the end of humankind and the words were misleading. There's also an interesting twist in that I think this is the first time that the audience is aware of something that NO ONE else in the cast is.
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The overriding feeling I had as I watched was that a lot of thought had been put into writing the episode/film.
*nods* It worked on several levels--I was very impressed.

far subtler references I really appreciated. Kendra informing us that Gina’s last name is Geminese for “resurrection”. Kendra telling Gina she’s “a life saver”. And I think it was Adama that said, in reference to Kara and Kendra’s tense relationship, “I’d like to sell tickets to that dance.”
Those were all brilliant, weren't they? They really worked for me and I liked the care taken in the script and delivery.

LOVE your meta on Fisk, and isn't it wonderful that they've made him a more sympathetic character in retrospect? I absolutely agree with this: Cain destroyed Fisk’s hope for the future. And when he was forced to participate in the massacre, she destroyed him. It was perfectly drawn without being laboured or forced.

First, there was her comment that we, the human race, “don’t have the luxury of becoming simply human again.”
Yes! My response to that was nausea.

She was reacting as a human would. Cain, on the other hand, was emotionless; one could say acting like a machine.
Gah! Yes! Perfect analysis and so chilling. Cain just totally gives me the shudders now and I'd honestly held her in a grey area for so long, not wanting to pass judgement completely until I saw what they had to say about her here. Now I don't think anything could redeam her in my eyes.

Later, in a rare moment of magnanimousness,
*snerk*

My exact words were, “You bastard!” Lee shouldn’t shoulder all the guilt over this botched mission. This whole mess started when Adama let a science team take a viper to research a super nova.
TRUE! Waaah! How did I lose sight of this?! I think I totally bought into Lee's guilt and was all 'oh, yeah, it IS all Lee's fault'. *glares at Adama* SEE WHAT YOU DO, ADMIRAL!?! Yeah, there was that moment where Adama first tells him about the circumstances of the failed science team and Lee has this reserved slightly critical look--I'm pretty damn sure he was biting his tongue deliberately, but didn't like it.

suddenly, we get “This is your team son, you make the call.” WHAT?! I can see we’ll be going into Season 4 with Adama still being on my s*** list.
Mine too. And yeah that moment was SOOO awful. Hypocritical old bastard!

after having put Kara in a position to be killed, I have to wonder if it was, in part, a reason for wanting to stick so close to her in ‘Maelstrom’? It was obvious in that episode that he was trying to protect her as best he could and given his inability to shake off feelings of guilt, responsibility and failure I have to believe he was trying to atone in some way for his actions in here.
Hmm, I hadn't considered that but it's certainly a strong reversal. His decisions in Maelstrom were very marked and flying WITH her is the opposite of what he did here. Also in Maelstrom he put faith (against all evidence) in her ability to stay alive and her will to live--in Razor he put his faith (darkly) in her willingness to die for the mission. Interesting!

this is The First Hybrid and he hasn’t, to our knowledge, been influenced by outside forces.
True! Your meta is always so refreshingly clear-sighted. *happy sigh*

a take on Picard shooting one of his crewmen before he could become a Borg in First Contact.
Possible. It's a bit of a cliche regardless, right?

. I liked how they depicted him as terrified after experiencing shared memories with the hybrid. It seemed a very Lee-like reaction. And with this new bit of history revealed we now can see why, in the mini, he knew Cylons have the ability to look like us.
Daft as it may sound, that is actually possibly my favourite thing about Razor. Because when I first watched the mini I was really hung up on that. I drove my viewing buddy crazy by pestering her with 'how did he know?! how did HE know?!' And i'd honestly resigned myself to never being satisfied with an answer on that. *satisfied*

Lee and Laura were in a room together! They spoke! Hey, I have to take what I can get. ;)
Awww! I squeed for you, I really did.
Also in Maelstrom he put faith (against all evidence) in her ability to stay alive and her will to live--in Razor he put his faith (darkly) in her willingness to die for the mission.

Hmmmm, interesting. I hadn't thought about it in those terms. Now you've made me want to think of everything that happened in between the two events that would have altered his perception. :)

I got all thinkety too on that point! ;) Unfortunately my RL is eating me alive right now otherwise I'd be posting meta left right and centre as Razor gave me such a wealth of material to work with. On Kendra and Kara as well as Lee for once! How bizarre! I'm usually so mono-character. *lol*
If I wasn't rushing off for a medical appointment, I'd be reading this at work and commenting :P Instead, I'm going to have to come back tonight. I can't let Boppy have all the fun commenting here ;)
I plan on getting back to your post. I read it and comments last night and was just too dead tired tonight to give proper feedback. Hopefully tomorrow I can get to it - slow TV night. ;)
Over from bop_radar's meta rec post. :)
Some great observations here, and YES for all you say about Adama and Lee. I need to rewatch again, too.

I'm glad to see someone else picked up on those Star Trek vibes. The idea of Pegasus being in dry dock, complete with a reluctant-to-leave Captain, while they refit the systems (and the person overseeing it having nefarious plans) reminded me a lot of a TNG ep I can't remember the name of. ;)
Hey, they even have a crew member named Hoshi! Not sure if you watched Enterprise. I survived about a season and a half of it. ;)

I'm hoping to do a rewatch this weekend to refine some thoughts I had and pick up on some things I discovered I missed thanks to other people's posts. :)
Not sure if you watched Enterprise. I survived about a season and a half of it. ;)

Hey, you got me beat! I only managed a season. ;)
Contrary to the lies she told her officers and supposed friends at her little dinner party....

That or it was the fastest descent to evil I ever saw.
I wanted to come away from Razor believing that circumstance made Helena Cain what she was. I wanted to find out that, if the story was true, that shooting her XO (and, as it turned out, her close friend) in the head was warranted in some way. I wanted to see that the brutalization of Gina was not all her doing. But what I saw was a woman without a shred of hesitation or remorse. Something in her died long before this war.

That's one of the reasons I find it so surprising that Ron Moore regards this as "humanizing" Cain; I found her lack of humanity from the beginning so striking. The contrast with Gina was very striking, especially since I got the impression that Gina had genuine feelings for Cain, but Cain was able to shut down whatever feelings she'd had for Gina. (Much the way Six had genuine feelings for Baltar--interesting that two different versions of Six had infiltrated the defense network at different points, and probably there were others.)

Lee shouldn’t shoulder all the guilt over this botched mission. This whole mess started when Adama let a science team take a viper to research a super nova. I’m trying to figure out how in the midst of fleeing the Cylons and looking for earth Adama felt it was OK to let a team go off on their own to do a little research.

That was the only part of the episode that felt truly contrived, and it was weak. Still, it's not entirely out of character for Adama to yell at other people when he's done far worse.
interesting that two different versions of Six had infiltrated the defense network at different points, and probably there were others.

That occurred to me too. It seems that the Six models had two missions to accomplish - bed people in power and gain their confidence, then plant the computer virus. And both Six's had the 'flaw' of falling in love or at least caring for their targets. Gina had ample opportunity to shoot Cain in 'Razor' and couldn't pull the trigger.

I think Ron's perception of Cain is yet another example of the disconnect he often has with the viewing audience.
Hi *waves* I'm here from Boppy's rec and gotta say I enjoyed reading! It's been so much fun to read solid meta on all aspects of Razor. I may drop back to comment in depth...but really wanted to let you know this is excellent. :)
Thank you! I really appreciate it. :) And feel free to come back. I've missed discussing BSG!
Your response to Razor was almost exactly like mine, except nicer. Heh. My main problem with it is I went into it expecting it to be an explanation of how Cain became who she was, a way to redeem (or at least explain) her a little even as we see the horrible things she's doing. Not so much! Instead we continue to get Cain = Evilest Evil that Ever Eviled (w/bonus Lesbian Angst!), and I come away dismayed and unhappy with BSG once again. They think they're being cutting-edge and fair, but they're not. I did really like Kendra's storyline, though, and while I could see her death coming from miles away, they at least made me feel for her.

I can see we’ll be going into Season 4 with Adama still being on my s*** list.

THANK YOU. I just. I seriously want to quote your whole paragraph about that scene between Adama and Lee in the CIC back to you because that was my EXACT response. I just hate his sanctimonious, cowardly bullshit that he's pulling all the time. It's easy to make the humanistic decisions, even if they're not necessarily what's best. But the second a really tough, ethical question comes up, Adama ALWAYS puts it off on someone else. ALWASY. ARRRRGHHHHH. I can't believe I used to really love that character, because I absolutely hate him now. Sigh.

I'm sorry to spread my bitterness all over your LJ.
I watched the extended cut of Razor last night. I expected to have whopping new insights, but not so much. I am going to do another post because there were some moments that helped to connect the dots better and flesh out some points. There was one scene in particular that did help explain why Cain is the way she is and makes the choices she does, yet I still couldn't muster any sympathy for her. Our pasts do shape us, but she had a choice as to how her past would shape her. I look at Kara and her frakked up life that was born from a frakked up childhood, but she could be a lot worse off than she is. She's chosen to try and do the right thing and be a decent human being. I just don't see a shred of humanity in Cain.

And on my third Razor viewing, I'm as pissed off at Adama as ever (and Ron by extension). Lee made a very difficult choice to sacrifice the team and a woman he cared deeply about in order to save thousands. Hell, maybe even earth. But that reasoning is tossed aside for the 'we don't leave anyone behind' argument. Really? How about the people who survived on the Colonies? Or those abandoned on New Caprica? Or maybe it's just his people he can't sacrifice? Then again he was willing to nuke a planet with his entire family on it. Gah! He just makes NO sense to me.

Hee. Don't worry about the bitterness. I'm sorry you didn't like the film more, but I understand where you are coming from. I still have high hopes for season 4. I don't know a lot, but what I do know gives me hope.