Asta 2

White Collar: All In

I hope everyone living in the U.S. is enjoying the extended holiday weekend. I had a long To Do list to tackle and, as always, have had mixed results in the tackling. But I think I'm getting more done than I usually do, if not everything I want to get done. I successfully killed my old desktop computer. The killing was intentional. The plan is to donate it to Goodwill so I can clear off the desk in the spare room and repurpose it. And while the White Collar marathon was running on USA yesterday, I altered my time between staring at the the TV and doing a massive dusting of the furniture and knickknacks. The amount of dust in some places was frightening. I also had a post it listing stuff I wanted to post about, but it seems to have become a victim of the cleaning. I guess what I had to say wasn't that important.

Oh, and not that anyone looks at my journal directly (opposed to via your Friends page) all that often, if at all, but I stripped it down to the basic component style until I decide what exactly I want to do with it. I still want a header, one preferably with Jamie.....and maybe others ;).....but the BSG theme, for various reasons, needed to go. We're heading into a new year, I have new fandoms and interests and it's as good a time as any for a fresh start. Now, on to the show.....



Anytime I start to think about the plot of a White Collar episode I have to tell my brain to stop because going down that road will inevitably lead to a headache. I'm not always willing to suspend disbelief or ignore the ginormous plotholes in a story, but because I love the characters so damn much I'm willing to in this show's case.....even if Neal risking getting shot as to not blow his cover was really pushing it.

As always, there were some fabulous and very telling character moments. The first occurs when Neal wonders aloud how the FBI found out about Nick Halden (sp). Mozzie points out Nick was not Neal's best work, unlike Steve Tabernacle. Neal says Steve was a good man; Mozzie is quick to correct Steve is a good man. There's a brief moment when Neal realizes the 'error' he made, speaking of one of his aliases in the past tense, as if that part of his life is over.

Neal questioning, however briefly, who he now is and his place in the world bookends nicely with the scene in which Peter confronts Neal over his duplicity with Mei-Lin. Peter tells Neal it's up to him whether or not their partnership comes to an end. Neal looks up at Peter, slightly stunned, and asks, "We're partners?" Neal's expression clearly conveys Peter's words meant something to him. It's likely not the first time the thought crossed Neal's mind, but I don't think it occurred to him that Peter would consider him his partner, or at least admit to it.

The moment is perhaps the biggest in their relationship. Peter is pretty much letting Neal know he sees him as an equal, someone he's coming to depend on. Whether a cop or federal agent, partnerships are important. Partners rely on each other, are there for each other at all times and have each others back. Neal hadn't considered the enormity of the situation until just then. And this is just after Neal has, if not lied to Peter, withheld pivotal information endangering Peter's case. As Elizabeth tells Neal, Peter wants to trust him, but Neal keeps giving him reasons to doubt the faith he's putting in him.

Of course, just at the moment Neal starts to enjoy his new partnership Mei-Lin drops the bombshell - whoever has Kate is FBI. It was a bit of a surprise. The show has done a reasonably good job convincing us that whoever is (supposedly) manipulating Kate is after something Neal has in his possession.

I'm going to assume Mei-Lin was telling Neal the truth and it creates some interesting scenarios. What if someone in the FBI isn't satisfied with Neal serving only four years for his crimes and Kate was strong-armed into dumping him, thus forcing him to escape? It would explain Kate asking Neal to turn over everything he has, which would be a hell of a lot of incriminating evidence. Or what if it's a rogue agent sick of seeing the criminals profit from their crimes? What if they are in cahoots with Kate? Neal only had three or four months left on his sentence (two different periods of time are given in the pilot) and then would have presumably reaped the rewards himself from what he had stolen. Could Kate have found out earlier Neal lied about San Diego and felt betrayed?

And there is another scenario I find very interesting. What if Peter is equally guilty of "I'm not lying, I'm just not providing you with all the information I have"? Peter has been adamant with Neal that he needs to forget about Kate and move on with his life. It's in Neal's best interests. I honestly don't think Peter has a clue where Kate is currently or what she may or may not be up to, but could Peter be aware that four years ago Kate had a hand in Neal getting arrested and being convicted? Perhaps she gave him up to spare herself?

I could be way off in my numerous possibilities. I just don't feel as if Kate will be around much, if at all, after this season and there would have to be a big betrayal on her part for Neal to finally move on.

Random things I enjoyed and/or can't meta to death:

The novelty socks. They are the gift that keeps on giving! Though I suspect Neal, if he were to buy Peter a gift, would buy Peter something really nice and useful rather than something gimmicky.

The little girl was adorable and I thoroughly enjoyed Peter's confessional talk with her, thus allowing Neal to get a good idea of Peter's depth of feeling for him. ;) However, Peter really thought the girl couldn't understand English when her father is fluent in the language? And would you really have a child that age translate what a group of "hostesses" are saying? Especially when her dad was there? ::hand wave::

June! They really didn't need June in this episode, but I was glad to see Diahann Carroll back. She's definitely filling the grandmother role. She even made Neal and Mozzie brownies! Ok, yes, she has servants, but that doesn't preclude her from enjoying baking and I like the idea she made them herself.

If June is filling the role of grandmother, Peter and Elizabeth were definitely shown to be mom and dad this week. Peter tells Neal they need to talk, but instead of taking him to the office he takes him to his house. While Neal can usually depend on Elizabeth for support, even she can't back him up this time. She can only sympathize with Neal so much, especially when she sees her husband's trust, and possibly career be battered once again. And I love Neal pleading with her not to abandon him. :)


USA, just weeks after announcing White Collar would be paired with Burn Notice on Thursdays has changed their mind. 'White Collar' is moving to Tuesdays at 10:00est beginning January 19. I don't have any strong feelings about the move. My guess is USA originally paired it with Burn Notice thinking they could use the series to help boost White Collar's ratings, but White Collar is doing well enough on it's own. Plus with moving Psych to Wednesdays at 10:00 (My immediate reaction was, "But it's always been on Fridays!", but then I realized I seldom watch in on Fridays. :p) it looks like USA is trying to develop a strong presence at 10:00 during the week. What's really funny is USA seems to be taking advantage of their sister network, NBC, weakness at 10:00 thanks to the failed Leno experiment.
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What was the Leno experiment? I know who Jay Leno is, but I can't say I'm familiar with his work...
You have no idea how unintentionally hilarious your comment is! :)

I'm sure you know Jay Leno was Johnny Carson's replacement when he retired. And for ten (I think) years he was the 'king of late night'. Then NBC decided they wanted to draw in a younger, hipper audience and basically forced Leno to 'retire' from the 1!:30 slot so Conan O'Brien could take over. At the same time, NBC feared losing Leno to it's competitors (word was ABC and FOX were interested in talking to him) so NBC offered him a two year deal to launch an entertainment/talk show at 10:00pm. Not only did it keep Leno from defecting to another network and possibly launching a competing show at 11:30, NBC felt they could reap financial benefits from scrapping five hour long dramas from it's schedule to accommodate him. His live show would be much cheaper to produce, so much so they felt they couldn't lose airing him at 10:00 five nights a week. What they didn't stop to consider was people look forward to dramatic series at 10. NBC has been bleeding viewers in that time period and now the network is regularly being beaten by the other networks as well as cable networks. Local news is also losing viewership and thus ad revenue. And now Conan is regularly getting trounced by Letterman at 11:30. So it's been a HUGE disaster and NBC's sister station, USA, looks to be taking advantage by scheduling it's already successful series up against Leno three nights a week.
Plus with moving Psych to Wednesdays at 10:00 (My immediate reaction was, "But it's always been on Fridays!", but then I realized I seldom watch in on Fridays. :p) it looks like USA is trying to develop a strong presence at 10:00 during the week.

That was my first thought--that they're taking advantage of the Leno dead zone to pull in viewers who would otherwise be watching programming on major networks.
The first occurs when Neal wonders aloud how the FBI found out about Nick Halden (sp). Mozzie points out Nick was not Neal's best work, unlike Steve Tabernacle. Neal says Steve was a good man; Mozzie is quick to correct Steve is a good man. There's a brief moment when Neal realizes the 'error' he made, speaking of one of his aliases in the past tense, as if that part of his life is over.

Good insight into this bit! I completely missed it.

I really did not see the twist coming at the end and is now dying to see the finale next week! Too bad I'm out of the country and has to wait another week before I can see it *sobs*
Can you cancel your trip? ;)

I'm anxious to see the mid season finale as well. The way USA cut the promo I do not think things are as they seem. I just hope they don't end on a cliffhanger. It will be long seven(?!) weeks. :(
Hee I'm half tempted to, but Europe is hard to resist, sorry Neal and Peter! :P

Ya I don't want to believe everything I've seen in the promo, I just hope the two men won't hurt each other too much, if not we have to wait 7 weeks for them to patch up!
Peter tells Neal they need to talk, but instead of taking him to the office he takes him to his house.

I know! That made my eyes go all o.O and starry at the same time! *is still in the first flush of happy new ep glee*
I know! He took him home to scold him! And even the dog knew to clear the room!
Averting my eyes from White Collar spoilers to ask if it's really true that the Leno thing really has turned into a flop? It's kind of hard to tell from across the Atlantic, but it hasn't seemed like it's made much of an impression either way. If it is a grand failure, then that's probably the best news I've heard this TV season. Nothing would be a bigger disaster to a TV fan than if the networks decided that scripted shows just weren't worth the effort.
I've been following the whole thing closely for that reason, and it's kind of hard to tell from this side of the Atlantic too! But the preliminary indications are that while the Leno show is probably succeeding on its own terms--i.e. because it's cheap to make, it's profitable even at vastly reduced ad rates--there has been a lot of unexpected collateral damage. NBC's scripted shows that performed well in the 10pm timeslot aren't doing as well in earlier slots (including the Law & Order shows); and the huge drop in viewership has carried over after 10pm, so the local affiliates' news shows are getting killed, and NBC's late night lineup is doing badly too. It's hard to say how those things balance out, but affiliates are pissed; NBC had to bring in the lawyers and the threats about a month into the new regime when some of them made noises about dropping Leno and running their own programming.
That does sound promising! I certainly hope that enough affiliates threaten to jump ship next season if they don't go back to a regular 8-11 prime time schedule next season.
Unfortunately, Leno has a two year contract which NBC could buy out, but given the idiots running the network aren't being shown the door themselves, I fear he may be there another season. In the meantime, a lot of writers and producers seem hesitant, to say the least, to work with NBC and John Wells, after they canceled his Southland before a single season 2 episode aired, has sworn never to work with them again. This is the man who gave them ER. So even if they dump Leno, it may take years to lure talent back to the network.

There are theories going around that NBC will either go the way of FOX, only program from 8 to 10 and turn the 10 o'clock hour over to the affiliates to broadcast, or end up as some version of a cable network.